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Name of author Rick Baker, P.Eng.

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If our ancient ancestors thought and acted like they were too busy they would have been eaten. Then where would we be?

by Rick Baker
On Apr 18, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

The next time you feel inclined to complain about being too busy think of your ancestors.

Wonderful heritage - Evolution didn't let you down.  Did it?

How about your descendants - what are you passing on to them?

Hopefully, you're not passing on the I'm-too-busy gene.

"Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." [a quote, far from Yogi Berra and Mark Twain]

by Rick Baker
On Apr 17, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

While those words could have come from the lips of Yogi Berra or Mark Twain, they did not.

It is a quote from the Danish Physicist, Niels Bohr (1885-1962). Bohr had a terrific personality and [it seems] sense of humour.

And, of course, he was a deep thinker. Here is another example: The opposite of a fact is falsehood, but the opposite of one profound truth may very well be another profound truth.

When tempted by worries...think of this Niels Bohr quote.

 

Don't give ideas the brake, give ideas a break - Support a Local Curious Person!

by Rick Baker
On Apr 16, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

I believe it has been clearly established that curiosity does not kill cats. I'm suspecting dog lovers created that myth...you should view that saying as anti-cat dogma.

Instead of dissing curiosity by repeating that anti-cat saying, especially to children - give a curious person a pat on the back!


 

It takes two to tug-of-war...unless, of course, you choose to battle people in your head.

by Rick Baker
On Apr 15, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

It takes two to tango; it takes two to tangle; it takes two to tug-of-war.

And, more often than not, the two must bring an excess of emotion to escalate the situation.

***

Sometimes it only takes one to tango, tangle, or tug-of-war. We all are quite capable of dancing with and fighting with imaginary foes in our heads.

Errors only become limitations when we choose to give them that power.

by Rick Baker
On Apr 14, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

We cannot practice when we don't know the what and how of task-details: we cannot teach when we don't know the what and how of task-details.

But, do not expect your teachers will be masters of work performance: knowing the what/how of tasks and doing work at the master level are 2 different things.

Mastery of tasks is rare; even the most skilled performers make errors; errors define near-term limits, however, near-term limits do not have to be long-term limiting.

Errors only become long-term limiting when we choose to give them that power.

Influencing Powerful People - #12

by Rick Baker
On Apr 13, 2019

Probably, most people should not work for powerful people. When I use the words powerful people, I mean people who:

  • hold positions of power over us, 
  • are driven to meet their goals [not ours], and 
  • put lots of pressure on us as we try to do work for them.
On top of this, powerful people tend to get things done, change their minds, discount others' abilities, be stubborn, be dismissive...etc.

In his book, 'Influencing Powerful People', Dirk Schlimm provides 16 major strategies and dozens of suggestions on how we can improve our ability to work with powerful people. 

He also advises, “Deciding not to work for or with a powerful person is not a sign of weakness but of wisdom.” 

That piece of advice triggered a memory - I once heard an educational guru speak words like, "People can behave in offensive ways, however, you do not have to be offended." The point was, some people behave in ways that others consider offensive. That's a choice they make. You have the ability to either be offended or not be offended by their behaviour. That's a choice you make.

I get that message and acknowledge it is accurate thinking and good advice. Here's an article I wrote on this topic a few years ago. 

While the advice is good, often, in real-life situations people cannot control their emotions and as a result they become offended when others behave offensively. Most people become offended when their powerful bosses behave offensively. The state of our emotions and our skills at self-control determine the outcome.

So, if we find ourselves getting anxious and stressed out because our bosses behave in ways that trigger our fears and bad emotional responses, we should remember Dirk's advice. 

“Deciding not to work for or with a powerful person is not a sign of weakness but of wisdom.” 

We can choose to not work for that boss.

This gives us at least 3 options:

  1. Choose to learn Dirk's strategies and tactics for changing how we behave so we do better when dealing with powerful people.
  2. Choose to follow Dirk's advice as captured in the above quote and stop working for the powerful boss.
  3. Choose to carry on as is and continue to have miserable work experiences.

Clearly, that last option is the poorest of the 3.

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Emotions & Feelings @ Work | Family Business and CFFB | Influencing | Leaders' Thoughts

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