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Influencing Powerful People - #12

by Rick Baker
On Apr 13, 2019

Probably, most people should not work for powerful people. When I use the words powerful people, I mean people who:

  • hold positions of power over us, 
  • are driven to meet their goals [not ours], and 
  • put lots of pressure on us as we try to do work for them.
On top of this, powerful people tend to get things done, change their minds, discount others' abilities, be stubborn, be dismissive...etc.

In his book, 'Influencing Powerful People', Dirk Schlimm provides 16 major strategies and dozens of suggestions on how we can improve our ability to work with powerful people. 

He also advises, “Deciding not to work for or with a powerful person is not a sign of weakness but of wisdom.” 

That piece of advice triggered a memory - I once heard an educational guru speak words like, "People can behave in offensive ways, however, you do not have to be offended." The point was, some people behave in ways that others consider offensive. That's a choice they make. You have the ability to either be offended or not be offended by their behaviour. That's a choice you make.

I get that message and acknowledge it is accurate thinking and good advice. Here's an article I wrote on this topic a few years ago. 

While the advice is good, often, in real-life situations people cannot control their emotions and as a result they become offended when others behave offensively. Most people become offended when their powerful bosses behave offensively. The state of our emotions and our skills at self-control determine the outcome.

So, if we find ourselves getting anxious and stressed out because our bosses behave in ways that trigger our fears and bad emotional responses, we should remember Dirk's advice. 

“Deciding not to work for or with a powerful person is not a sign of weakness but of wisdom.” 

We can choose to not work for that boss.

This gives us at least 3 options:

  1. Choose to learn Dirk's strategies and tactics for changing how we behave so we do better when dealing with powerful people.
  2. Choose to follow Dirk's advice as captured in the above quote and stop working for the powerful boss.
  3. Choose to carry on as is and continue to have miserable work experiences.

Clearly, that last option is the poorest of the 3.

Tags:

Emotions & Feelings @ Work | Family Business and CFFB | Influencing | Leaders' Thoughts

If you are uncomfortable with your work, that's contagious. If you enjoy your work, that's contagious.

by Rick Baker
On Apr 9, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

What type of attitude are you spreading?

How much is your attitude affecting the people you work with?

Are you inspiring people & growing profits?

Unresolved, lingering problems gnaw away at brain energy. Attack problems and pluck that destructive power away from them.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 31, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

The brain represents 2% of body mass while it consumes 20% of body energy. 

The brain is 'energy intensive'.

Much brain energy is consumed/wasted on negative thinking - i.e., wasted on negative feelings and emotions...wasted on rumination & worry.

You gain energy-value when you reduce your brain's energy-waste.

So - Tackle problems quickly: hit 'em high, hit 'em low...rip the ball out from their hands.

When leaders fail at the little details, especially the little interpersonal details, trust erodes.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 28, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Trust is pretty much everything. Followers look to leaders for positives, subliminal or overt justifications for building trust.

 

Top performers feel disappointed when they make errors. Then, quickly, they replace that thinking with confidence.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 26, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Self-confidence is precious.

Self-confidence is self-grown.

Self-confidence is essential.

A successful Sense of Urgency: that's doing things promptly when you know the right things to do and you know how to do them well.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 23, 2019

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Anything shy of this isn't a successful sense of urgency.

Anything shy of this is guesswork, bad planning, or fighting phantom fires.

Anything shy of this is pretty much guaranteed to annoy everyone you drag into your situations.

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Copyright © 2012. W.F.C (Rick) Baker. All Rights Reserved.