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Name of author Rick Baker, P.Eng.

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A thin skull allows important stuff to get in easier.

by Rick Baker
On May 6, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Mistakes bang into and bounce off thick skulls.

This annoys Mistakes because their role is teaching lessons.

The problem is: When thick skulls won't let them in Mistakes cannot teach lessons to thick-skulled brains.

So Mistakes keep coming back, knocking on thick skulls over and over and over again.

While Mistakes are born to be great teachers, over time they tend to develop an uppity attitude and a nasty sense of humour. Even when they've given up on teaching well-concealed brains Mistakes have no desire to stop knocking on the thick skulls that house those brains.

The key foresight point is: We can count on Mistakes to come back over and over again to knock on our skulls if we keep them thick.

The bottom line is: As long as our skulls remain thick we will never have the opportunity to learn the lessons taught by Mistakes.

 

Multi-task for mediocrity or focus for excellence.

by Rick Baker
On Apr 20, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Brain experts are telling us: The uptrend in multi-tasking, especially multi-tasking involving high-tech communication devices, is changing neural patterns by strengthening some paths and weakening others. The neural paths that allow us to talk on the cell phone while surfing the web or creating a spreadsheet are strengthening while the neural paths that allow us to focus and concentrate are taking a back seat.

As this trend continues huge numbers of human beings will be able to do huge amounts of mediocre stuff.

We have a choice: we can choose to multi-task our way to mediocrity or we can focus & concentrate for work-performance excellence.

Put another way: we can choose to multi-task or we can choose to task-multi. [And major success only happens when we choose the latter.]

 

Perception is reality...and perceptions change over time, taking reality with them.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 21, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Perceptions are fragile things.

Our perceptions are partial, filtered, skewed...

Even some of our most-vivid and most-believed memories are proven wrong.

 

Tags:

Brain: about the Human Brain | Thought Tweets

Yes, it can be difficult...that's why it's called work.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 16, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

But, Difficult should not mean Unpleasant.

Physically-difficult work burns up energy in muscles, etc. It strengthens the muscles...that's a good thing...unless you're lazy, in which case physically-difficult work would be annoying.

Cognitively-difficult work burns up energy in neurons and other places. It strengthens neuronal connections...that's a good thing...unless you're lazy...then work, again, would become annoying.

About being annoyed or stressed out, etc: the cause behind negative feelings is not work. So, let's not place the blame on work when, in fact, there is another culprit.

Other people prefer it when you are present-minded rather than absent-minded.

by Rick Baker
On Feb 16, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

'Getting present' is a Focus exercise...a mind-process of narrowing and fixing attention. 

'Staying present' is a Concentration exercise...a mind-process of holding attention.

These two mind-processes, focusing and concentrating, involve different areas of the brain and they require the development of different skill setsFor me, and it may be different for you, focusing is an exercise of thought discipline. It requires thought discipline to cause attention to dwell on the single isolated situation or topic, ignoring everything else. This discipline can be very challenging. Similarly, concentration can be challenging when tasks are tedious or uninteresting. On the other hand, most people find concentration becomes easier when the topic or situation is one they are very interested in or excited about. 

Inspiration is the music of creative intelligence.

by Rick Baker
On Feb 14, 2020

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Our gift of creative intelligence must be there to inspire ourselves and others.

Our intuition is a special gift, with deep roots in our unconscious brains [lizard brains].

Our ability to inspire is linked to our creative intelligence and intuition - a wonderful aspect of our 'human condition'.


 

Tags:

Brain: about the Human Brain | Influencing | INSPIRE PEOPLE - GROW PROFITS! | Thought Tweets

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